social media

What Not to Post on Social Media During a Divorce

While it may seem like a posting about your divorce on social media will provide you with a cathartic release, it is best to avoid doing so. In fact, most family law attorneys recommend staying off social media entirely. Remember that anything and everything you say online can be used against you in divorce court. That said, if you do decide to remain on social media during this time, here are some things you should avoid doing.

Announce your decision to get divorced

It is tempting to announce your divorce on social media and change your relationship status on Facebook, but that does not mean it is a good idea. The decision to get a divorce is deeply personal and private, so deciding to announce it to everyone you have ever befriended online could really hurt your spouse’s feelings. You do not want to get on your spouse’s bad side right before you go through a divorce. Try talking about potential ways to announce your divorce together.

Talk badly about your spouse

The divorce process can be incredibly frustrating at times, so it is understandable why you would want to get on social media and vent about your spouse. Instead of sharing all the private details about your marriage (and making everyone you know online very uncomfortable) on social media, talk to a therapist or a close friend.

Also, anything you say about your spouse on social media can be used against you during the divorce. It also reduces the chances of your spouse wanting to work with you during divorce negotiations.

Incriminate yourself

If you post pictures of yourself on social media going on a lavish vacation or a shopping spree, this will be used against you in court when the judge determines child support and spousal maintenance and alimony. The division of marital assets and property could also be impacted by these photographs.

Speak about an affair

If you are having an extramarital affair, do not post about it on social media. Even if your spouse knows about this relationship, photographs of you with another person could influence the court’s decisions when determining child custody and child support.

For assistance with your divorce, contact us online or call us at (512) 768-9737.

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